Drug testing athletes for steroids

In 1989, the US Supreme Court for the first time upheld the use of suspicionless drug testing of employees in the workplace. The Court ruled 5-4 in the case, National Treasury Employee's Union v. von Rabb , that testing employees without cause does not violate the . Constitution's Fourth Amendment protections against unreasonable searches, paving the way for an unprecedented wave of unnecessary workplace drug testing programs. The US Supreme Court has since ruled to allow the random drug testing of student athletes as well as students who participate in non-athletic extracurricular activities, such as band or the chess club.

Starting in the 1960s, a series of federal and state court decisions subordinated Fourth Amendment privacy rights of individuals to the perceived needs of the society (Cornish and Louria 1991). To do so, in part, requires circumventing the warrant provision requiring "probable cause," a phrase that legally profoundly restricts invasion of individual privacy. Circumvention has been accomplished in three ways. First, the Court declares that obtaining warrants in certain circumstances is impractical or [End Page 35] not required; therefore, probable cause is not required. Second, the...

Drug testing athletes for steroids

drug testing athletes for steroids

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