High dose steroids lupus

Patient education: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (Beyond the Basics)
Patient education: Preterm labor (Beyond the Basics)
Patient education: The antiphospholipid syndrome (Beyond the Basics)
Patient education: Sjögren’s syndrome (Beyond the Basics)
Patient education: Deciding to breastfeed (Beyond the Basics)
Patient education: Common breastfeeding problems (Beyond the Basics)
Patient education: Pumping breast milk (Beyond the Basics)
Patient education: Maternal health and nutrition during breastfeeding (Beyond the Basics)
Patient education: Long-acting methods of birth control (Beyond the Basics)
Patient education: Birth control; which method is right for me? (Beyond the Basics)

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The adverse effects of corticosteroids in pediatric patients are similar to those in adults (see ADVERSE REACTIONS ). Like adults, pediatric patients should be carefully observed with frequent measurements of blood pressure, weight, height, intraocular pressure, and clinical evaluation for the presence of infection, psychosocial disturbances, thromboembolism, peptic ulcers, cataracts, and osteoporosis. Pediatric patients who are treated with corticosteroids by any route, including systemically administered corticosteroids, may experience a decrease in their growth velocity. This negative impact of corticosteroids on growth has been observed at low systemic doses and in the absence of laboratory evidence of HPA axis suppression (., cosyntropen stimulation and basal cortisol plasma levels). Growth velocity may therefore be a more sensitive indicator of systemic corticosteroid exposure in pediatric patients treated with corticosteroids should be monitored, and the potential growth effects of prolonged treatment should be weighed against clinical benefits obtained and the availability of treatment alternatives. In order to minimize the potential growth effects of corticosteroids, pediatric patients should be titrated to the lowest effective dose.

There is no doubt that sunlight (more specifically UV light) has a major effect in activating the disease. Many patients notice that their rashes, as well as joint pains and other symptoms are worse after a period of sunbathing. Nevertheless, sun sensitivity is not a universal problem, and the majority of patients whose lupus is under control find no special need to avoid sunlight. Sun barrier creams have only been of limited help. Various local lupus groups have collected information from manufacturers in their own countries and have provided considerable guidance in choice of makeup and UV-barrier creams.

High dose steroids lupus

high dose steroids lupus

There is no doubt that sunlight (more specifically UV light) has a major effect in activating the disease. Many patients notice that their rashes, as well as joint pains and other symptoms are worse after a period of sunbathing. Nevertheless, sun sensitivity is not a universal problem, and the majority of patients whose lupus is under control find no special need to avoid sunlight. Sun barrier creams have only been of limited help. Various local lupus groups have collected information from manufacturers in their own countries and have provided considerable guidance in choice of makeup and UV-barrier creams.

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