Steroid hormone receptor protein

This entry describes 3 <p> This subsection of the ‘Sequence’ section lists the alternative protein sequences (isoforms) that can be generated from the same gene by a single or by the combination of up to four biological events (alternative promoter usage, alternative splicing, alternative initiation and ribosomal frameshifting). Additionally, this section gives relevant information on each alternative protein isoform.<p> <a href='/help/alternative_products' target='_top'> More...</a> </p> isoforms i produced by alternative splicing . Align Add to basket Added to basket

The Oxandrolone hormone does not carry any estrogenic related side effects. It does not aromatize and cannot lead to gynecomastia or water retention due to increases in estrogen levels. It further carries no progestin related activity, which again supports no estrogenic related side effects. Due to water retention being impossible with this steroid, this will decrease the risk of high blood pressure. Excess water retention can promote high blood pressure. Some steroids that do not aromatize can lead to high blood pressure, such as Trenbolone , but Anavar is rarely associated with this trait.
 

The most commonly used AAS in medicine are testosterone and its various esters (but most commonly testosterone undecanoate , testosterone enanthate , testosterone cypionate , and testosterone propionate ), [53] nandrolone esters (most commonly nandrolone decanoate and nandrolone phenylpropionate ), stanozolol , and metandienone (methandrostenolone). [1] Others also available and used commonly but to a lesser extent include methyltestosterone , oxandrolone , mesterolone , and oxymetholone , as well as drostanolone propionate , metenolone (methylandrostenolone), and fluoxymesterone . [1] Dihydrotestosterone (DHT; androstanolone, stanolone) and its esters are also notable, although they are not widely used in medicine. [54] Boldenone undecylenate and trenbolone acetate are used in veterinary medicine . [1]

The vast majority of breast cancers are positive for estrogen receptor (ER) and depend on estrogens for growth. These tumors are treated with a variety of ER-targeted endocrine therapies, although eventual resistance remains a major clinical problem. Other steroid hormone receptors such as progesterone receptor (PR) and androgen receptor (AR) are emerging as additional prospective targets in breast cancer. The fundamental mechanism of action of these steroid receptors in gene regulation has been defined mainly by several breast cancer cell lines that were established in the late 1970s. More recently, breast cancer patient-derived xenografts (PDX) have been developed by multiple groups at institutions in several countries. These new models capture the large degree of heterogeneity between patients and within tumors and promise to advance our understanding of steroid hormone receptor positive breast cancer and endocrine resistance. Unfortunately, steroid hormone receptor positive breast cancers are much more difficult than their receptor negative counterparts to establish into sustainable PDX. Herein we discuss the derivation of steroid hormone receptor positive breast cancer PDX, several pitfalls in their genesis, and their utility in preclinical and translational steroid hormone receptor research.

Steroid hormone receptor protein

steroid hormone receptor protein

The vast majority of breast cancers are positive for estrogen receptor (ER) and depend on estrogens for growth. These tumors are treated with a variety of ER-targeted endocrine therapies, although eventual resistance remains a major clinical problem. Other steroid hormone receptors such as progesterone receptor (PR) and androgen receptor (AR) are emerging as additional prospective targets in breast cancer. The fundamental mechanism of action of these steroid receptors in gene regulation has been defined mainly by several breast cancer cell lines that were established in the late 1970s. More recently, breast cancer patient-derived xenografts (PDX) have been developed by multiple groups at institutions in several countries. These new models capture the large degree of heterogeneity between patients and within tumors and promise to advance our understanding of steroid hormone receptor positive breast cancer and endocrine resistance. Unfortunately, steroid hormone receptor positive breast cancers are much more difficult than their receptor negative counterparts to establish into sustainable PDX. Herein we discuss the derivation of steroid hormone receptor positive breast cancer PDX, several pitfalls in their genesis, and their utility in preclinical and translational steroid hormone receptor research.

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